Tag Archives: sharing

Social Networking for Youth Services Librarians

The Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California now has a blog, a Facebook Page, and Twitter:

Check out ACL’s new social networking avenues, maintained by Penny Peck and Meredith Steiner.
Blog: http://bayviewsandmore.wordpress.com/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/BayViews
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/#!/ACLBayViews

The blog is fun for any youth services librarian, not just those in California, as it lists news such as book awards, obituaries of authors or illustrators, programming ideas, Review of the Week, and more!

Eureka! Leadership Institute registration now open!

The Eureka! Leadership Institute is a great, six-day intensive program for building new leaders for our libraries.  The application process is rigorous, but worth every minute, and Eurekans who come out of the program go on to do interesting and exciting new projects in their libraries.  Encourage your staff to apply, or maybe even apply yourself.  For more information, and to download the application materials, go to http://eurekaleadership.org/.

Besides, the Institute will be held at the beautiful Dolce Hayes Mansion, right here in the South Bay.

Dolce Hayes Mansion

Overdrive and the fine print

The Librarian in Black has an illuminating post about some detective work that fellow librarian Ryan Claringbole undertook regarding Overdrive.  In a nutshell, Overdrive is limiting e-book catalog options depending on how patrons are authenticated in each library system.  It’s in the contract, so they aren’t doing anything wrong, but is it right?  Read the whole story here.  What do you think about these kinds of practices in our libraries?  Do you think libraries have the right to be upset if they sign the contract?  Is there another up and coming option to Overdrive?

George and Joan present: Libraries and Economic Recovery

If you haven’t ever participated in a webinar or in-person engagement with George and Joan before, you really should!  They offer smooth, free-thinking presentations on a variety of library related topics.  This Wednesday, there is a free webinar at noon, Pacific time on how to support entrepreneurs in your service community.  George and Joan bounce ideas off each other, are funny, warm, and thought-provoking.  They answer questions thoughtfully, and are ready to be challenged by participants with tough scenarios.

As we all know, even as our budgets go down, libraries are working hard to help their communities recover through job and business support.  Learn new techniques to do so with a couple of the best speakers in our field.  Check out http://infopeople.org/training/libraries-and-economic-recovery-supporting-entrepreneurs for more information.

George and Joan

George and Joan

What do people do in libraries, anyway?

The Pew Research Center has announced that they will launch a new study to investigate how the digital age impacts library usage and the users.  The story is hereladder of books

A new way of sharing

Check out Etienne Wenger‘s theory on Communities of Practice.  He says the following to describe what makes it different from just a group with shared interests:

Members of a community of practice are practitioners. They develop a shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems—in short a shared practice. This takes time and sustained interaction.

Intrigued?  Read more on it at the link above.

Libraries can share with each other too!

One of the main goals of PLP is to get all of our libraries working together, across systems.  So many times, one of our libraries does something really special, but unless it gets published in a journal, or there is a presentation at a CLA conference, no one knows about it.  What if we could share all that expertise among our libraries, right away?  What if your library was grappling with a brand-new initiative, but then you found out that another PLP library had a lot of experience with that, and could give you a good start?  It would save a lot of work and frustration in our time-strapped environments, and build a working connection.  Think about what you are experts at doing.  What makes your library special?  Do you have a person that is a powerhouse that would love to share, but hasn’t found the platform to do so yet?  PLP is that platform.